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6 Podcasts for Foodies – The New York Times

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Starter episode: “Jon Kung’s Recipe for Spaghetti and Lion’s Head Meatballs”

Recorded primarily in home kitchens, this convivial podcast has an intimate feel that sets it apart from most interview shows. Lucy Dearlove, a radio producer, hosts conversations with chefs, cookbook authors and other foodies, incorporating the sounds of their cookery — paper bags rustling, ingredients being chopped, oil sizzling in a hot pan — to create an immersive experience. In addition to food and our rituals surrounding it, Dearlove turns a lens on the physical spaces where we cook, exploring the design of modern kitchens while incorporating history, architecture and personal narratives. No matter the subject, “Lecker” is a comforting, lovingly made treat that leaves you feeling warm inside, the way you feel after a really good meal cooked by a friend.

Starter episode: “Moving House, Moving Kitchen”

This fun and inspiring podcast from Bon Appétit promises to “answer desperate home chefs’ cries for help.” Each episode begins with a listener question about a culinary crisis, such as how to cater a dinner party when all of your guests have different dietary restrictions, or how to overcome a fear of cooking a specific ingredient (say, chicken). Other topics are more recipe-focused — how to make a brownie that’s not too sweet, or a gluten-free pizza that tastes like the real thing. After follow-up questions, Chris Morocco, the Bon Appétit food director, enlists a rotating panel of food writers and experts to suggest solutions to the problems, which listeners practice and report back on.

Starter episode: “Fancy, on a Budget”

You know you’re in good hands with this series from The Ringer, as it’s hosted by David Chang, the founder of Momofuku, and Chris Ying, a veteran food writer. Each episode focuses on a single ingredient, which is typically a whole food like cauliflower or halibut, but it can also be a branded item like Pillsbury dough or King’s Hawaiian rolls. From there, Chang and Ying agree on one recipe to make with this ingredient, and are joined by a guest chef in a face-off to make the best version of that dish. To add a little chaos, the chefs are also randomly assigned a constraint — make the dish using only a microwave, prepare it in less than 20 minutes or use only shelf-stable ingredients. Listening to these pros cook with one arm tied behind their backs is reliably hilarious and educational — you’ll learn about substitutions, recipe hacks and how to make the best of whatever kitchen situation you find yourself in.

Starter episode: “Sweet Potatoes”

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